Roundup: Episode VII means big bucks at any time of year

Vader at Disneyland. Or Disney World? I can't tell. Disney. The Orlando Business Journal’s Jim Carchidi looks into a few ways that Disney will profit from the Star Wars delay. Because people will go see Star Wars at any time?

Podcasts. There’s a new episode of Full of Sith out today, with Bryan and Bobby talking about the week’s developments.

Auditions. Jedi News talked to one of the ‘Thomas’ hopefuls.

The old boss. George Lucas has lots of big-name San Francisco support for his museum, Mashable reports.

This again. With Star Wars in the news again, I’m surprised it took so long before we got another look at Jedi religion, this time from Details.

Czech Republic home to more than 15,000 ‘Jedi’

15,070 Czechs listed their religion as ‘Jedi’ in the latest census. AFP reports:

“Fifteen thousand adherents, which is the size of a small town, is not a negligible social phenomenon,” Stanislav Drapal, deputy head of the statistical office, told reporters.

In Prague, statisticians registered 3,977 Jedi knights, or 0.31 percent of the capital’s population.

I’m sure the Czech atheists are just thrilled. Yeah, it’s funny and gives us dumb stuff to blog about, but I’m not a fan of people treating their census like it’s a silly meme. Save it for Facebook.

The catchup: One dad introduces the saga to his kids

Sunday reader. Using the Blu-rays, Hitfix’s Drew McWeeny is showing the Star Wars movies to his two sons for the first time. It’s a great story (they’ve seen Clone Wars but nothing else) and probably one of the best articles (and certainly the most detailed) that I’ve read on kid’s reactions to the saga. In order: A New Hope, The Empire Strikes Back, The Phantom Menace, Attack Of The Clones and Revenge Of The Sith, with the Return of the Jedi entry coming on Thursday. A great read, whether you’ve shown the movies to kids yet or not.

Occupy Coruscant? Twitter’s favorite minions of evil, Death Star PR, takes time out of their busy planet-blasting schedule to debunk Luke Skywalker’s assertion that he is part of the 99%.

Kids. A Yoda backpack helped one flower girl make it down the aisle. (via)

People. Watch Mark Hamill in the opening of Friday’s Chuck premiere.

Spoofs. The Jedi Church. Literally. Well, spoofily.

In the news: Colbert dings politician for Portman pregnancy remarks; U.K. atheists blast ‘Jedi’ census

Fake-pundit fun. Stephen Colbert blasted Mike Huckabee for his comments on Natalie Portman’s pregnancy. “Look, I’m no fan of single mothers either. But it’s Natalie Portman we’re talking about. That kid she’s pregnant with is Luke Skywalker,” Colbert said. “So logically, if you’re against her pregnancy that means you’ve aligned yourself politically with Emperor Palpatine. You’re alienating all of Tatooine. It’s a swing planet.” Of course Tatooine is a swing planet.

Serious matters. An atheist group in the U.K. has launched a campaign to convince folks not to write down “Jedi” on their census forms as a joke. No word on how they feel about ‘real’ Jedi. (via)

Legal. Lucasfilm is back in court again – the British Supreme Court this time – over the Shepperton studios stormtrooper replicas.

Random. Harrison Ford is helping to develop a Facebook game. Okay, so it’s an environmentally-concious Facebook game… But it’s still a Facebook game. Which I guess is better than watching him get his chest waxed again.

Book review: Introduction to Jedi Knighthood

I have a particular fondness for the independently-published Star Wars philosophy book. People are all over the board in how they see the Force and Star Wars and these books reflect that.

Jedi Manual Basics: Introduction to Jedi Knighthood by Matthew Vossler came across to me, from its description, as a book written for kids (another fondness of mine). But it’s actually a workbook for those wishing to study Jediism as a religion or personal philosophy.

Jediism has been gaining ground as a religion in recent years. This book lets you walk through the basic precepts and examine your own understanding of the Force through a series of studies and writing assignments.

I would have liked to see a bit more actual background over assignments. And the use of URL’s as reading assignments could be problematic as sites go down and change.  As a result, its usefulness in the long term is doubtful. But if you’re at all interested in Jediism, this would be an interesting way to explore it further.