George Lucas talks Red Tails, ‘retirement’ in the NYT

George Lucas is the subject of a lengthy profile in the New York Times today, and gives them the full story on his ‘retirement.’

“I’m retiring,” Lucas said. “I’m moving away from the business, from the company, from all this kind of stuff.”

He was careful to leave himself an out clause for a fifth “Indiana Jones” film. But otherwise, “Red Tails” will be the last blockbuster Lucas makes. “Once this is finished, he’s done everything he’s ever wanted to do,” says Rick McCallum, who has been producing Lucas’s films for more than 20 years. “He will have completed his task as a man and a filmmaker.”

The profile focuses on Red Tails, of course, but also features a bit of frank talk on Star Wars. Of the special editions, prequels and backlash, and why we’re not going to see any more:

Lucas seized control of his movies from the studios only to discover that the fanboys could still give him script notes. “Why would I make any more,” Lucas says of the “Star Wars” movies, “when everybody yells at you all the time and says what a terrible person you are?”

It also covers the Indy 4 refrigerator, girlfriend Mellody Hobson, ‘personal’ films and all things “corny and wonderful.” It’s worth a read.

SDCC ’09: Continuing coverage of Muggs, stormtroopers, and roller-skating mechanical chickens

Robot Chick Skate Party / starwarsblog @ Flickr / Photo by David IskraNow that everyone’s settled back home and able to blog more easily, we’re starting to see a few more con reports. StarWars.com has recaps of The Empire Muggs Back and the Robot Chicken Skate party (which is now moving on to L.A.,) while Rebelscum posted a gallery of Sideshow’s customized stormtroopers. Meanwhile, Atom.com has recruited G4 hostess Olivia Munn to help with their Fan Movie Challenge. We can only pray that mullet-play is optional.

In EUish news, the Scribe Awards were also given out at the con, and Karen Miller’s The Clone Wars: Wild Space did not take the Best Novel – Adapted prize under Speculative Fiction. It went to an actual adaptation, Bob Greenberger’s novelization of Hellboy: The Golden Army. However, James’s Rollins novelization of Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull did take the Adapted prize in the category of General Fiction. (How are aliens general fiction, again?) Congrats to Rollins and condolences to Miller, in any case.

Miller’s Wild Space and Rollin’s Crystal Skull novelization up for tie-in awards

The Clone Wars: Wild Space by Karen MillerThe International Association of Media Tie-In Writers has announced their nominees for the 2009 Scribe Awards, and two Lucasfilm works are on it. Karen Miller’s The Clone Wars: Wild Space got a nod for Best Speculative Fiction Adapted, while James Rollins’ adaption of Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull is up for Best General Fiction Adapted. Miller is “massively chuffed!”

This is the first Scribe nomination for any Star Wars (or Indy, though that pool is considerably smaller) work, though Alan Dean Foster was named last year’s Grandmaster.

Indy IV, The Clone Wars up for Saturn Awards

The nominations for the 35th Annual Saturn Awards are out, with Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull scoring five nominations, including Best Science Fiction Film and nods for both Harrison Ford and Shia LeBouf. The Clone Wars also picked up two nominations, one for Best Animated Movie and another for Best Syndicated/Cable series.

The Saturns are presented by the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films to honor genre film and tv, so pretty much everything of note has a nod. The Dark Knight leads with 11 total. Expect to hear about the winners in June.