Tag Archives: star wars stylebook

Episode VII roundup: The Force Awakens, but the rumors don’t stop

spoilers-swirl-muppet→ In the wake of The Force Awakens reveal, there’s a new Full of Sith Rumor Control with Bobby Roberts. As always, a must-listen for the spoiler-lovers among us.

→ Per usual, any reveal, no matter how major, doesn’t stop the rumors. Some guy on Twitter tweeted what’s supposedly an extreme close-up of Luke Skywalker’s beard. (Yuh-huh.) Making Star Wars themselves on what was filmed at a certain outdoor set at Pinewood. And Star Wars 7 News adds a bunch of message board stuff about Luke to the MSW stuff from the other day. (Consider yourself warned.)

→ And for the non-spoilerphobes among us, Bob Iger told Bloomberg TV (skip to 10:25) that the name comes from “a few people” including Kathleen Kennedy and J.J. Abrams, Disney themselves – basically, exactly who you’d expect.

→ Some housekeeping: Yes, I’ve changed our tag for the new film to The Force Awakens, to reflect our other film tags. No, I will not immediately stop using the term Episode VII, because it is. And grammar geeks, here’s what Lucasfilm’s Leland Chee has to say about title formatting.

Introducing @SWStylebook, because Twitter isn’t pedantic enough about Star Wars already

swstylebook-screenshot

Remember our unofficial Star Wars style guide from a few years back? Well, now there’s a Twitter account, @SWStylebook, because apparently I am insane. Apparently a lot of other people are, too, because it took off like gangbusters last night and I am still a little freaked out. Please follow it and also feel free to ask/suggest stuff!

The (completely unofficial) Star Wars style guide: Terms every fan should know how to use correctly

Every time I see someone use the term ‘Jedis,’ I sigh.

Maybe it’s petty, but few things drive me battier than glaring Star Wars typos, particularly when they come from professional and semi-professional news outlets. Here are a few Star Wars terms and spellings every fan (and entertainment journalist) ought to know and use correctly in the years ahead.

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