Tag Archives: diversity

Rebels cast reveals spark discussion of diversity, representation

Rebels cast (concept art)

While we’ve focused on the female character introductions and (lack of) toys so far, Mia Moretti at Eleven-ThirtyEight takes on the issue of character races and representation – and the fandom reactions to it.

The importance of diversity is something that Bria and Nanci at Tosche Station wrote up not so long ago, while Brian took on some of the common arguments against it. While we’re a while from seeing if Rebels can deliver diversity beyond the main cast, it’s interesting to note that these discussions weren’t happening as openly even as far back as The Clone Wars debut.

As for the issue of female action figures, Amy Ratcliffe has some numbers.

Podcasts: Dunc talks Club Jade on Full of Sith, the Forcecast takes on Star Wars diversity

I always feel weird about self-pimping (mostly,) but so be it: I’m a guest on the most recent episode of Full of Sith, with hosts Mike Pilot and our pal/translator Bryan Young. We talked about Episode VII and the sequels, Mara, running fan site and, of course, Club Jade.

In other recent podcasts that are relevant to our very specific interests, Bria of Tosche Station and Tricia of Fangirl Blog were on the Forcecast to discuss diversity and gender in Star Wars.

Today’s must-read: Reporting harassment at a convention

With summer con season now formally ramping up, it’s as good a time as any to remind folks that harassment is not okay – and what to do about it.

Over at Scalzi’s Whatever today, writer Elise Matthesen shares how she reported her sexual harasser at recent convention. It’s a fantastic post with great advice about making sure things are formally on the record – the perpetrator in her case is not a first-time offender.

Inspired by Matthesen, Maria Dahvana Headley shares some of her own tales of being harassed at genre conventions. A former pirate negotiator, she has this chilling statement: “The pirates in the maritime industry were generally a great deal more polite than the creeps in the SFF world. They stuck to terms.”

It’s been a while since we’ve addressed this topic, and sorry to be a downer as we approach the weekend, but this is important stuff for everyone to know.

Hollywood’s lady problem: 30% representation?

The Hunger Games

Well, here’s a factoid for you: Only 30% of the speaking characters in last year’s 100 top-grossing films of 2012 were women. (Here’s those 100 films – how many of them were led by women? By my count, 12, the top one being The Hunger Games.) And that’s only the beginning of the facepalm-worthy figures.

And that’s just in front of the camera. Behind the camera? Well.

Star Wars still kind of a boys club, shockingly

day_11_lightday_12_light

I swear I’m not taking This Is Madness particularly seriously – some things I am happy to leave to Hondo – but let’s admit it: It’s particularly disheartening to see neither of the female characters made it past the second round.

Hell, Leia, perhaps the most recognizable Star Wars lady, could only muster 33% of the vote against a droid. Now I love Artoo, but come on: He’s a droid. And having no particular attachment to either character, I’m not sure what to think of Chewbacca’s victory over Ahsoka. I can understand favoring Chewbacca – I mean, who hates Chewbacca? – but Ahsoka is certainly one of the most developed characters (not female, just characters) to come out of The Clone Wars, and she still only got 35%.

So much for the theory of a Clone Wars surge, huh? Should we chalk Obi-wan’s victory over Han to Ewan McGregor fans who didn’t stick around for the other votes? (No cookies for you, Wantons.)

Does it even really matter? Of course not. It’s a goofy March Madness takeoff, nothing more. (And given that I generally have little patience for most March Madness ripoffs, I’m a little ashamed at even falling for this in the first place.) But it’s still a damn shame, and a key reminder: No matter how many t-shirts we buy, we’re not done yet, ladies.

Her Universe makes 2013 the ‘Year of the Fangirl’

Year of the fangirlHer Universe and Ashley Eckstein today announced Year of the Fangirl, a new campaign to highlight geek girls. Ashley’s team – Tricia Barr, Erin Kelahan, Amy Ratcliffe, Victoria ‘Scruffy Rebel’ Schmidt and Lillian Skye – will be highlighting ladies as their “fangirls of the day.” You can fill out the form yourself or even nominate a friend (or twenty.)

The ‘fake geek girl’ is back, and no one is impressed

College Humor is not making many friends in the comics blogosphere, lately. The ad at right has appeared on the back page of several DC Comics books, and… Well. Take it away:

WonderAli: That Joke isn’t Funny Anymore. “College Humor, and DC by association, are perpetuating the message that comics simply cannot possibly be enjoyed by girls. They are for BOYS ONLY–mouth-breathing, women-hating boys at that. Sorry, intelligent woman who is enjoying the hell out of Wonder Woman, this book is not for you!”

The Mary Sue’s Susana Polo: So, The Back Cover Ad on Batman This Month Is a “Fake Geek Girl” Joke. “I just can’t decide which is more depressing to imagine: someone in marketing at College Humor (whose work I generally enjoy) pitching this specific example from their series of real life comic book “villains” to DC for an ad… or someone on DC’s marketing team saying “These ‘villains’ you came up with are all super funny, but you know… Some of our readers might feel targeted by the “guy who gets angry on forums” joke or the implications that they’re not good at personal interaction. And we probably shouldn’t use the one about executives… seeing as how we’re employed by them. So we’ll use the one that’s a girl. Girls don’t read comics anyway.””

iFanboy’s Jim Mroczkowski: Real Geeks Only, Ladies. “Funny how people who were bullied throughout their childhoods will become the most hateful bullies themselves at the first whiff of a victim. Hang on: when I typed “funny,” I misspelled “unimaginably depressing.” A round of applause for human nature, everybody.”

Are we seriously not past this crap, yet? UPDATE: Becky Allen says the same, only much better than I.

Here are all the ‘supervillains,’ if you’re really curious. Or, simply skip straight to restore your faith in humanity.